Get to know our athletes.

Drive. Focus. Problem-solving. A competitive edge. These are the traits that define an U.S. Olympic Athlete - and the traits you value in your organization. As a proud partner of the United States Olympic Committee, Adecco works with Olympic Athletes to get them placed in leading companies around the world, including each of the athletes whose testimonials we've proudly featured below. To learn more about how we can enrich your team with Olympic-class talent, check out our Athlete Career Program, or contact us today.

Veronica Day, U.S. Skeleton Team Member

This Vienna, Virginia native began her skeleton career in November of 2010, following the Vancouver Olympic Winter Games. At the time, Day was a NCAA Division I long jump and triple jump star at Elon University. After joking with her college roommate about making the bobsled team, Veronica looked into what it would actually take to become an Olympic bobsledder.

After passing the required physical fitness test given by the U.S. Bobsled and Skeleton Federation, she was invited to try her hand on the ice. It was then she realized that the skeleton was her true calling of the track. Now as an Olympic Development Athlete, Veronica has been exciting her coaches with her lightning-quick start speed and determination to win gold.

In her USOC Athlete Career Program video, Veronica speaks of the challenges she faces with time management. She recognizes the importance of creating lists to balance sport, work, life, and studies, and focuses on setting small goals to achieve her far-reaching goals.

Allison Jones, U.S. Paralympic Alpine Skiing and Cycling Member

A Colorado Springs resident, Allison was born with a birth defect that left her with a deformed right femur. At nine months old, her parents made the difficult decision to have her foot amputated, and femur and tibia fused together. But as Allison describes it in her website biography, “This could have set me up for a life of lower expectations and lower activity levels but not with my parents.  My mother and father were very active and I was to take part in everything. I learned to ride a bike, skateboard, rock climb, white water raft, hike, ski, and to just be a kid. I only knew to be a kid and not someone with a disability.”

Skiing

At five years old, Allison began skiing with the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colorado. Three years later her instructor recommended that she begin competitive training. By 2001, while in high school, Allison made the U.S. Disabled Alpine Ski Team and a year later was picked for the World Cup and Paralympic teams. It was here she won her first international medal in Querays, France.

Allison began her Winter Paralympic career in Salt Lake City in 2002, where she won two silver medals in the Giant Slalom and Super-G.  Then in 2006 at the Torino Paralympic Winter Games she won gold in the Slalom.

Cycling

In 1998, Allison and her sister attended what they thought was just a normal race at the local velodrome. That “normal race” turned out to be the Disabled World Championships.  Seeing a person with a disability cycling sparked her interest in the sport, so in the following spring she learned how to ride a track bike and began training to compete. In just two years, Allison would be trying out for the Sydney Paralympic Games.

In cycling, Allison has won two bronze medals, a silver and one gold medal.  In 2008. at the Beijing Paralympic Games, she became the only athlete to compete in both the winter and summer Paralympics. And remarkably at the London Paralympic Games in 2012, Allison became the first U.S. athlete to win gold medals in summer and winter individual events.  Though the team does not get picked until early February, Allison is one of the top hopefuls for the Sochi Paralympic Winter Games in multiple skiing events.

Work, Life, Sport

In her USOC Athlete Career Program video, Allison talks of the difficulties with balancing work, sport and life. She recognizes the importance of focusing on her priorities to keep her training on schedule, while balancing time spent with her family and fulfilling her work responsibilities with Adecco. 

Travis Jayner, U.S. Short Track Speedskating Team Member

This Canadian-born dual citizen speedskater was introduced to the sport at the early age of five. It’s likely he inherited his drive to compete from his father, who was also an elite speedskater and short track champion. As he got older, skating continued to be his true passion, even though he participated in a variety of other sports. After graduating high school with academic honors, Travis attended both McGill University and Concordia University in Montreal to study Urban Planning and continue the development of his skating. In 2005, Travis moved to Midland, Michigan and began training at the national team center in Marquette, Michigan. He has since moved to Salt Lake City, Utah and lives with two other skaters.

In 2010, Travis qualified and was named team captain of the U.S. Speedskating Team at the Vancouver Olympic Winter Games. There he earned a bronze medal in the men’s 5000m relay events. With the Sochi Olympic Winter Games set to begin, Travis hopes to return to the podium - this time with a gold medal around his neck.

In his USOC Athlete Career Program video, Travis explains the importance of having motivation and drive - not just in sports, but also in work and life.  He emphasizes that having passion and a strong work ethic will allow you to be the best in whatever you do.

Pat Meek, U.S.  Long Track Speedskating Team Member

Born in the Chicago suburb of Evanston, Illinois, Pat is a third-generation speedskater. With the help of his father and a 10-gallon bucket, he began speedskating when he was just two years old. His father continued to coach him all the way through high school, and instilled in Pat a love of the sport and pride of continuing the family tradition.

After high school, Meek moved to Salt Lake City, Utah to develop his speedskating career. In 2006, Pat made the U.S. team and has been training ever since. He’s discovered that his talent is in distance skating and is now a member of the U.S. National Long Track Program. He spends six to eight hours a day, six days a week training on the ice or in the gym. Pat is thrilled to be heading to Sochi, where he wants to show the world that he’s one of the best.

In his USOC Athlete Career Program video, Pat talks about his strong determination to reach his goals. He also explains that partnering with Adecco has enabled him to work with a diverse group of people and provided him the resources and mentorship to help “bridge the gap” once his skating career is finished.

Stephen Lambdin, U.S. Taekwondo Team Member

This Rockwall, Texas native began his taekwondo career at the five and has always wanted to represent the United States at the Olympics. Even since his first lesson, Stephen has given it his all, whether it is practice or competition.  Over the course of his career, Stephen has made fifteen different U.S. national teams.

With determination, drive and his faith, Lambdin hopes to one day achieve Olympic glory.

In his USOC Athlete Career Program video, Stephen speaks about overcoming adversity from a major injury by persevering and relying on his family and his faith.   He credits the USOC Athlete Career Program and Adecco for enabling him to learn skills while allowing him to travel to competitions.