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Adecco Workplace Insights Survey: 2012 Outlook on Jobs & the Election

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Adecco Workplace Insights Survey: 2012 Outlook on Jobs & the Election

Survey background

Methodology & background

  • Adecco conducted an Omnibus survey regarding Americans’ outlook on jobs, the economy and the 2012 Presidential Election.
  • Telephone survey of 1,014 American adults
    • Fielded by Opinion Research Corporation (ORC)
    • Conducted January 12 - 15, 2012
  • Differences between various demographics groups were also explored:
    • Gender
    • Parents
    • Age/generation
    • Income
    • Education
    • Geographic Region
    • Employment Status
    • Survey results have a margin of error +/- 3.08% for this sample size.

Key findings - 2012 Election

Jobs Creation Will Most Influence Americans’ Vote for President in 2012

  • Half (49 percent) of America will be most influenced by jobs creation when they vote in the 2012 presidential election.
  • Behind jobs creation, healthcare reform (18 percent) is the second most influential issue to impact voters’ decisions.

Americans Most Confident that President Obama is the 2012 Presidential Candidate with the Best Plan to Create Jobs

  • Despite the various job creation plans proposed by GOP presidential contenders, 36 percent of Americans believe President Obama has the most successful plan to create jobs in the U.S.
  • Of the remaining candidates, only 15 percent of Americans think Mitt Romney has the best plan to create jobs and less than half that amount believe that Ron Paul (8 percent) or Newt Gingrich (7 percent) have the best plan. Only three percent of Americans believe Rick Santorum has the most successful plan to create jobs.

President Obama Top Choice for Office “Cube-mate”

  • While the race for presidency isn’t always a popularity contest, it’s interesting to see that four in 10 Americans (41 percent) would most want to share an office with President Obama more than any other presidential candidate.
  • In fact, only one out of 10 Americans (10 percent) would want to share an office with Mitt Romney and even fewer would want to share an office with Ron Paul (9 percent), Newt Gingrich (7 percent) or Rick Santorum (5 percent).

Americans Believe Congress & the Federal Government More to Blame for Lack of Jobs than Obama

  • While about a fifth of Americans (21 percent) blame corporations and businesses most for the lack of jobs creation in the U.S., Congress and the Federal Government are close runners up with 18 and 15 percent of Americans’ vote, respectively. Fourteen percent of Americans believe President Obama is most to blame.
  • Thirteen percent of Americans blame banks or financial institutions for lack of jobs but employed Americans (16 percent) are more likely to blame this group than those Americans without jobs (10 percent).
  • While Americans are quick to point fingers at various individuals and groups for lack of jobs, one in 10 Americans still don’t know whose fault it is.

Key Findings - Jobs Outlook

Americans Want the Government’s Help Bridging the Job Skills Gap

  1. While 66 percent of Americans think the U.S. government should give incentives (such as tax breaks) to businesses to create more jobs, a close 64 percent believe the government should offer job seekers additional skills training or education.
  2. In fact, those Americans who have the lowest incomes ($35K and below) or who are the least educated (graduated high school or less), want skills/ education training most.
    1. Eighty-one percent of Americans earning salaries of $35K or lower say that the government should offer job seekers additional skills training or education to create more jobs.
    2. The same is true for those with less education – 70 percent of Americans who have graduated high school or less feel this way. Interestingly, however, this group was also least likely (23 percent) to pursue additional education (training, degree, etc.) for the purpose of career advancement in last year.
  3.  Only four percent of Americans think the U.S. government is doing exactly what it should be to create more jobs.

Majority of Americans View a Temporary Job as a Good Career Option

  1. Temporary jobs are more favorably viewed today than in the past. Nearly two-thirds (63 percent) of Americans say they view temporary jobs more positively than they did last year. That might be a result of a huge majority (86 percent) of Americans believing a temporary job is a good career option for people looking to gain valuable work experience.
  2. Americans are also more likely to work in different fields than they were in 2011. Almost 7 out of 10 (68 percent) Americans would be more willing to take a job in a field outside of their degree or study today than they would have been last year. And for those who are unemployed, that notion is even stronger. Seventy-three percent of unemployed Americans would be more willing today to take a job in a field outside of their study today, versus 65 percent of employed Americans.
  3. Women may be more flexible when it comes to finding a job than men. Seventy-two percent of women would be more willing today to take a job outside of their field of study compared to 64 percent of men.

Americans Optimistic that More Jobs Will Be Available in 2012 than there were in 2011

  1. Despite uncertain economic growth for the year ahead, a majority (60 percent) of Americans believe there will be more jobs available in 2012 than there were last year.

Forget Company Perks, Time Off and Company Culture – Job Security Still Most Important to Americans 

  1. Similar to 2011, when it comes to their job, the most important thing to Americans is job security.  However the importance of job security increased significantly since 2011 (31 percent  indicating it is the most important thing) vs. 21 percent in 2011).
  2. Interestingly, in 2011, health benefits were perceived as equally important (20 percent) to job security. Today, however, job security notably outranks health benefits which is now weighted equally with salary (16 percent vs. 17 percent, respectively).
  3. Not a single American (zero percent!) considers company perks (such as free lunches and discounts) MOST important to them, and just one percent are focused on vacation days or days off.
  4. While job security is most important to Americans, 72 percent would consider leaving their current job or career for increased salary or compensation. What else would compel them to move? Even greater security! Sixty-four percent of Americans would consider leaving their current job if they had guaranteed job security.
  5. Interestingly, men (76 percent) would be more likely than women (68 percent) to consider leaving their current job or career for a new one if they got increased salary or compensation. Women (58 percent) would be more likely than men (50 percent) to do so for greater health benefits.

One in two Americans Looking for a New Job in 2011 Actually Started One

  1. Nearly a third (30 percent) of Americans looked for a new job in 2011, with about half as many (16 percent) starting one.
  2. Compared to 2011, slightly fewer people plan to look for a new job in 2012 (27 percent vs. 30 percent last year) and similarly, fewer plan to start something new this year (23 percent in 2012 plan to start a new job vs. 28 percent in 2011).
  3. People living in the South were more likely (18 percent) than those living in other regions to switch careers in 2011.

More Americans Plan to Ask (and Receive) a Raise in 2012 – Especially Men

  1. Nearly a quarter (24 percent) of Americans plan to ask for a raise, bonus or promotion compared to a fifth (20 percent) of Americans who planned to do so last year. Slightly fewer (13 percent) actually did end up asking for a raise in 2011.
  2. But while only a quarter of Americans plan to ask for a raise this year, many others are anticipating one coming their way. Two out of five (41 percent) Americans plan on getting a raise, bonus or promotion in 2012.
  3. More than half of all men (52 percent) expect to ask for OR receive a raise, bonus or promotion at work in 2012, compared to just 37 percent of women.

 

Main Findings: 2012 Presidential Election & Jobs

Main Findings: Jobs Creation in the U.S.

Main Findings: Jobs 2012: What Matters Most to Americans

Main Findings: Americans' Outlook on Jobs - Past & Future

Economic report - Expert insights into today's workplace economy